This whole thing makes me cringe. Wear what you want! Your old enough to know what You like. So what if I have crapey skin. It shows I've lived. I'm not going to cover up my age because it makes the young people uncomfortable. It's where we are all headed. Might as well get comfortable with it. Maybe we should learn to focus on the things that matter, like how we treat each other and stop shaming people about their appearance.
Much of the advice is okay, but in my opinion the need for advice is greater among younger women. Where I live, most women past 50 look far more stylish than many women in their twenties and thirties. And why do you say that "of course, our bikini days are over now"? I know women in their seventies and even eighties who still look great in a bikini.
We all know that we dress one way for the beach, another way for church, funerals, weddings, etc. One would hope that as a woman matures, so does her sense of style. Gracefully say good-bye to the micro minis you wore at 16, skimpy half tops and very low rise pants that expose your midriff, seductive plunging necklines and sausage tight clothing that desperately cling to the bygone days of your youth.
While lace-up gladiators are key in the sandal game next spring, the most surprising footwear trend to come out of the SS20 shows was the boot. In what can be seen perhaps as a signal of the loosening of seasonality, numerous designers chose to accessorise their spring collections with what was previously winter-appropriate footwear. Christopher Kane did it with the cowboy, Saint Laurent made it slouchy, while Prada and Pyer Moss championed the leather knee-high and Molly Goddard and Loewe gave boots a summertime spin with an injection of bright colour.

You could call it the Tarantino effect as numerous designers harked back to the late '60s/early '70s with a free spirited take on their collections. From Alberta Ferretti's retro suede to Fendi's psychedelic touches and Rixo's full-blown recreation of Woodstock, the style icon for SS20 might just be found at the Once Upon A Time In Hollywood ranch.


And just like that disco’s not dead. The wide collar favored by the Studio 54 set made a surprise comeback on the spring 2020 runways. Modernized on coats, jackets, and button-downs at Lanvin, Ferragamo, JW Anderson, and beyond, the look is often shown with contrasting colors to make it really stand out. Because what’s the point of a super collar if you can’t really see it?
When you were four, you dressed like a four-year-old. When you were twenty, you dressed like a twenty-year-old. And now that you are over 50, explore the selection of beautiful casual and elegant clothes available for this age group. Cultivate a style that makes you look attractive, comfortable, and chic. Be a role model for the younger generation. Let them see how a mature and confident woman should present herself. You'll look and feel so much better.
I just turned 50, I wear a size 3, or 26", I am very active, run a horse breeding farm, burns a lot of calories. I love wearing short skirts, low tops, and heels, plus bikinis. My favorite jeans are by Miss Me. I have had a couple of plastic surgery procedures, most people guesstimate me to be 35-40. I feel 25. I am updating my wardrobe, adding some leather pieces, and nice sweaters, but I will dress young as long as I can!
Last season found us in a sea of flowing tulle, indication that gala gowns were ready to hit the circuit beyond your basic black-tie affair. Expanding on that idea for spring 2020 are lovely and light tiered dresses that manage to offer volume, high drama, and maximum twirl-ability. Oscar de la Renta and Roksanda took the idea pretty in pink, while Preen, McQueen, and Dior went classic in black and white.
I just turned 50, I wear a size 3, or 26", I am very active, run a horse breeding farm, burns a lot of calories. I love wearing short skirts, low tops, and heels, plus bikinis. My favorite jeans are by Miss Me. I have had a couple of plastic surgery procedures, most people guesstimate me to be 35-40. I feel 25. I am updating my wardrobe, adding some leather pieces, and nice sweaters, but I will dress young as long as I can!
Susan Blakey was ahead of the curve, you might say, in launching her blog, Une Femme d’um Certain Age, after noting the absence of conversation about style for women over 50. Susan’s style exudes a Paris sensibility. She looks effortlessly chic, with that air of confidence that comes with knowing who you are and not trying to impress everyone. Her fashion blog has expanded to include travel wardrobes and destinations. Escape with Susan and embrace her joie de vivre.
When you were four, you dressed like a four-year-old. When you were twenty, you dressed like a twenty-year-old. And now that you are over 50, explore the selection of beautiful casual and elegant clothes available for this age group. Cultivate a style that makes you look attractive, comfortable, and chic. Be a role model for the younger generation. Let them see how a mature and confident woman should present herself. You'll look and feel so much better.
Whether we like it or not there are situations and places that require a certain way of dressing. Although this site is directing the issue toward mature women, I often see younger women who dress shabbily, inappropriately, and too provocatively. Some people in the name of freedom of style proclaim that a person should be able to wear whatever they like, wherever they like. But this is not only an irresponsible attitude, but also wishful thinking.
Before we share our selections for the top fashion blogs for women over 50, we think it appropriate to explain our mission. PrimeWomen.com was conceived as the response to a world of publications targeting women in their 20s and 30s -women just beginning their careers and finding their way in life, experimenting with fashion and trends. The ones to whom the fashion designers market shamelessly. At PRiME, we wanted to acknowledge and celebrate the fact those other publications seemed to conveniently overlook: The Prime Women generation spends $400 million more annually on consumer goods and services than any other generation. She is smart, successful and savvy. She has the financial stability to travel, invest, and be selective in her purchasing power.
Crochet is getting a cool update come spring. Think ultra-feminine dresses, polished suiting, and eveningwear that feels modern with a special touch of Grandma’s handmade crochet. As the fashion industry looks for ways to become more sustainable, there’s something special about a “trend” that embraces a slow, handmade technique that can be passed down generation after generation—à la that treasured family heirloom that lasts forever.
While lace-up gladiators are key in the sandal game next spring, the most surprising footwear trend to come out of the SS20 shows was the boot. In what can be seen perhaps as a signal of the loosening of seasonality, numerous designers chose to accessorise their spring collections with what was previously winter-appropriate footwear. Christopher Kane did it with the cowboy, Saint Laurent made it slouchy, while Prada and Pyer Moss championed the leather knee-high and Molly Goddard and Loewe gave boots a summertime spin with an injection of bright colour.
From Dolce & Gabbana's jungle-inspired collection to Max Mara's army outfits and the numerous bulky, pocket-heavy jackets seen at Hermes, Stella McCartney, Jonathan Simkhai and Bottega, there was an injection of safari-inspired fashion across the collections, which you can channel in everything from shirts and shorts to jackets and belt bags for the season ahead.
Her blog about fashion over 50 was created specifically to help other women avoid the mistakes she made. “I thought other people might learn something from this,” she says. “You lose your way fashion-wise taking care of kids and aging parents. I thought maybe I could save people some steps if I shared what I learned.” Street describes her 50+ style as modern and feminine with “a little rocker edge. It’s a little bit more sophisticated than I wore most of my life,” she says.

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